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GPS-Enabled Lighting to Save Oceanside, California, More than Half a Million Dollars Annually

As part of its commitment to reduce energy consumption, the City of Oceanside recently installed more than 7,700 GE LED roadway fixtures equipped with a GPS-enabled controls system.

Expected to drive energy and maintenance savings of approximately $600,000 annually, the installation of GE LED fixtures with LightGrid™ controls continues to position the city as a leader in connected and energy-saving solutions.

GPS-Enabled Roadway Fixtures

As part of the LightGrid controls system, Oceanside’s Public Works team now has a real-time view of how each of the 7,700 street lights across the city is operating. The solution includes a GPS chip on every fixture via the LightGrid node or photo control, allowing the city to monitor each light through a Web-based interface and immediately respond to maintenance or operational needs.

The controls system also allows the city to activate more precise “on/off” and street-light dimming schedules, particularly in low-traffic areas and during overnight hours, to save the city in energy-related costs.

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“Illuminating our city with GE’s LED street lights with LightGrid gives us control like we’ve never had before,” said Kiel Kroger, Oceanside Public Works division manager. “We’re able to efficiently light roadways in a way that makes sense for how our city operates day to day, all while reducing our energy bills.”

GE’s LED Street Lights with LightGrid™ provide control, energy efficiency and savings for the city of Oceanside, California.

Intelligent City

Energy-efficient lighting is a part of a greater initiative—the Green Oceanside campaign, which was established to educate residents, businesses and visitors and to implement programs for energy efficiency, recycling, water conservation, energy conservation and more.

Funded by a $5 million government grant, the Oceanside Public Works department was driven to complete this lighting project because of its potential to realize large energy and maintenance savings.

Replacing legacy high pressure sodium (HPS) street lights is expected to reduce annual carbon dioxide emissions by 1.7 million pounds, which is equal to removing nearly 150 cars from the road or adding more than 200 acres of forest.

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“The feedback from citizens and city staff has been just as important as the anticipated energy and cost savings,” said Kroger. “Citizens of Oceanside like the fixture style and the light quality produced, while city staff are also pleased by the energy and maintenance savings and expected return on investment.”

In addition, it helps the city promote energy efficiency and inch closer to its goal of leveraging data and operating as a more intelligent city, Kroger said.

Additional upgrades include 900 city park light fixtures, parking lights, pier and decorative lights in the downtown area.

Click here to learn more about LightGrid.

Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad Pedestrian Bridge Rehabilitation Project Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that a DMX control solution plays in creating stunning dynamic color effects in a pedestrian bridge. Lighting and control design by Anthony Kuhtz, Lighting Designer with Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber, and Greg Smith, Lighting Designer with Michigan Lighting Systems. Photography by Cory Morse. Lighting by Insight Lighting, Cree and Nicolaudie.

The challenge in creating a bridge lighting design with controls that you don’t know how the owner is going to use it, is to plan for as much flexibility as possible. A complete training program was included in the project to assure the owner would be properly trained to control the system.

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DMX controls were chosen to allow each red/green/blue (RGB) LED luminaire to be individually controlled.

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The white LED bridge deck safety lighting utilizes 0-10V dimming to allow these fixtures to be dimmed when the color lighting scheme provides sufficient light on the bridge deck and to avoid having the white deck lighting outshine the RGB lighting.

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The lighting control system utilizes a DMX controller located approximately 300’ from the bridge to take advantage of the existing electrical service, control cabinet, and raceways and reduce cost. It is connected to secure wireless access on the bridge.

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Mobile device apps allow the owner to access the controller from the bridge deck wirelessly. The cost of the wireless access was offset in an agreement from the service provider to provide public wireless access, with advertising, on the bridge.

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600V rated low voltage cabling that could be installed in the same conduit with power cabling was designed to reduce and hide conduit on the bridge structure.

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Multiple channel DMX wiring was utilized to simplify future maintenance. The multiple channel approach allows you to isolate problems to a single channel, rather than all of the control wiring for the entire bridge.

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The programming software utilized by the DMX controller allows the owner to change lighting scenes based on a calendar. The controller also has an astronomical timeclock to turn off all lighting during daylight hours. The timeclock allows maximum energy savings with minimal maintenance.

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PLC Provides Control System for Washington State Route 520

PLC-Transportation has finished its largest project to date; Washington State Route 520’s new tunnel and roadway lighting control system was recently completed. Three tunnels’ lights on the east side of Seattle’s Lake Washington and two miles of interconnecting roadway lighting are controlled using the ELMS system. ELMS is the Electrical Lighting and Management System, NTCIP Standard 1213. The ELMS system provided the ability to configure, control and monitor roadway and tunnel lighting circuits using public data communication infrastructure from the WSDOT offices 15 miles away in Shoreline, Washington.

The system consisted of three tunnel lighting control cabinets, each of which had an ELMS datalogger/controller and fiber optic communications to send data to the Shoreline based server and workstations. The architecture of the ELMS system will allow for additional structures and dataloggers to be added to the system. The PLC-Transportation’s team included integration partners Gridaptive and The Ferrari Group as well as project manager Tom Remedios, hardware engineer Steve Houle, field technician Jasmin Grebovic, and programmer Norm Dittmann.

Click here to view the architecture of the SR520 solution.

Click here to learn more about the ELMS System.

Applied Engineering Solutions Head Office Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that a connected lighting control solution plays in an engineering head office. Lighting and control design by Sunny Ghataurah, Doug McMillan and Brad Ou-Yang, Lighting Designers with Applied Engineering Solutions. Photography by Ema Peter. Lighting controls by Elan and Lutron Electronics.

Main-lobby luminaires create the feel of a Fairmont hotel using high-mounted dimmable LED, 3000-lumen, white pendants that match the ceiling. 2x18W LED adjustable/recessed downlights providing higher illumination for the reception desk, with luminaire control connected via smartphone, desktop/TV app and security system.

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A rich/warm/residential/hotel feel for the boardroom is achieved via 2x18W recessed/adjustable LED downlights with internally lit 90W LED indirect pendants, providing reduced glare and better vertical illumination for videoconferencing.

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Luminaire control is connected via smartphone, desktop/TV app and security system. The boardroom has an additional in-room wall mounted controller with scene switch that integrates lighting, AV, blinds and fireplace Luminaire control connected via smartphone, desktop/TV app and security system.

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The project was designed in October 2012 to ASHRAE 90.1-2010, although local code was ASHRAE 90.1-2007; enclosed spaces have dimming luminaires integrated with vacancy sensors, bathrooms have occupancy sensors, and all lighting is controlled via smartphone and security system. The majority of luminaires are OFF during the day.

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Daintree Networks Provides Technology for Universal Music Group’s Energy Reduction Project

Daintree Networks recently announced its technology was deployed in a major energy efficiency project undertaken by Universal Music Group (UMG). Daintree Networks ControlScope® software and intelligent devices are being used to significantly reduce energy use across 150,000 square feet of space over four floors at UMG’s new offices in Woodland Hills, Calif. UMG will seek LEED Silver certification for the project, which was completed February 28.

Daintree Networks’ technology aided UMG in a progressive energy-saving project, one of the first and biggest of its kind in Southern California. UMG’s project included installing technology for daylight harvesting, dimming, LED lighting fixtures, and occupancy sensors. The project also allows UMG to comply with California’s Title 24 requirements, which call for a 25-percent reduction in energy consumption in both commercial and residential buildings compared with previous state requirements.

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“When we began looking at options for upgrading our offices, we knew we had some significant work to do to ensure our new building would comply with the latest version of the Title 24 standards. We also understood the importance of conservation to decrease our environmental impact and reduce energy costs,” said Kevin Garabedian, UMG’s Vice President of Administrative Services and Facility Operations. “We considered various proprietary solutions that were cost prohibitive. Within a fairly short time, however, it became clear Daintree’s wireless networked smart technology was the best and most cost-effective way to achieve compliance while offering the flexibility to meet our future needs due to its use of open standards.”

California’s Title 24 energy standards were created in 2008 specifically to drive reduction in energy use for commercial and residential buildings. The 2013 standards went into effect July 1, 2014, and must be met for all new and retrofit building permits granted after January 1, 2014.

Art Space THE CUBE Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that a lighting control scheme plays in producing color-changing effects in an art space in the city of Moscow. Lighting control design by Aleksey Zvyagin, Lighting Designer, MDM-Light. Photography by Pavel Lantsov.

The project of lighting art space The CUBE is unique. Here, it was necessary to take into account not only features of three different functional areas, but create something special. With LED RGB systems, the designers had the opportunity to make different lighting scenarios in separate functional areas and to control them via a PC.

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The designer used zoning by functional area to develop the control system plan.

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The CUBE is situated in a former three-tier factory structure consisting of a main exhibition area at the bottom, with a conference room inside the cube, and the roof terrace.

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The cube walls are mobile panels that can be adjusted up and down, creating various configurations on the first floor. To illuminate this space, the design includes 150 open fluorescent lamps arranged in several rows at the ceiling and at walls consisting of perforated metal panels. Thanks to the careful disposition of lamps, the perception of the space can be completely changed.

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When the lights are turned OFF, the walls and ceiling seem to be tightly sewn metal.

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The light of the lamps is refracted by cells of the panels, creating bizarre light patterns and transforming the room.

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By connecting different ranks of lamps in various zones, the pattern of light can be changed.

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The outdoor terrace on the roof of the “cube” is fantastically transformed by spectacular decorative LED linear luminaires.

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The lenses are angled to produce an unbroken wall wash effect across 14 meters of wall.

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The RGB system provides high color saturation.

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CLTC Wins LEEP Award for Controls Project

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The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) recently won an award for “Best Use of Lighting Controls in a Single Facility” from the Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) Campaign for a state-of-the-art lighting system demonstration at NorthBay VacaValley Hospital in Vacaville, CA.

Click here to learn more.

eBay Customer Service Center Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that a lighting control scheme plays in both producing both color-changing effects and ongoing energy cost savings at the eBay Customer Service Center. Lighting control design by Mark Greenawalt, lighting designer for SmithGroupJJR. Photography by Scot Zimmerman Photography and Mark Greenawalt, PE, LC, LEED BD+C, SmithGroupJJR.

This 240,000-sq.ft. facility achieved LEED-Gold with points for Light Pollution Reduction and Controllability of Systems Lighting. Facade lighting during pre-curfew hours is additionally controlled by a DMX storage/playback device that orchestrates four programmed shows. Dynamic color changing LED fixtures at the parapet illuminate the tree canopies from above while landscape fixtures uplight from below, both located for ease of maintenance.

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Open offices designed with fully-dimmed daylight harvesting. Controls included photosensors, vacancy sensors, and wireless overrides mounted on steel beams. Visual comfort is maximized with pendant indirect lights and automated shades for glare control.

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Energy efficient LED parking lot fixtures installed with peer-to-peer wireless system with individual and group control, continuous dimming, automated scheduling, and remote monitoring and measurement.

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Pendant and accent fixtures addressed the complexity of the open structure ceiling.

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Color changing lights for the auditorium stage are controlled by 48-Channel theatrical dimming console that features 24-step sequences, 199-step cues, moving light controls, and MIDI/DMX communication.

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Primary colors of the corporate logo helped achieve the performance criteria to be playful and colorful.

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Common areas utilize centralized lighting control relay system with area overrides and emergency night lights on generator. Private offices equipped with vacancy controls with full dimming for occupant comfort.

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The connector tunnel between buildings features 5′-square gloss black star field panels. Controls make Fiber Optic stars twinkle. Blue fluorescent lamps uplight the space above while MR-16 spots accent the path of egress.

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Cafeteria includes energy saving daylight harvesting for perimeter zones.

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Exterior lighting is controlled by automated relay panels with astronomic time clock programming.

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Energy Efficiency: High performance classroom lighting includes integrated mode controls and vacancy sensors tied to HVAC controls. Pendants provide uniform lighting with 2-lamps in general mode OR 1-lamp in audio-visual mode.

Budget: Lighting package was value engineered in half while maintaining a robust lighting control system.

Forensic Center Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that a sophisticated lighting control scheme plays in controlling lighting at a forensic center. Lighting control design by Michael Shiu, lighting designer for Stantec Consulting Ltd. Photography by Richard Johnson. Lighting controls by Fifth Light.

This 550,000 SF Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex is one of the largest of its kind in the world. The lighting design meets the $497M project budget and creates a practical atmosphere for a modern, integrated, and energy efficient building. Fixtures are robust, secure, and easily maintained. All building fixtures are controlled by a DALI system, make use of daylight, occupancy and photosensors, and use T8 fluorescent, LED or compact fluorescent lamps to meet IES, LEED and ASHRAE requirements. In the coroner’s courts entrance canopy, an exterior lighting sensor and astronomical clock control the recessed compact fluorescent TTT lamp pot
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Simple architecture and decorative lighting in public spaces create a welcoming yet authoritative atmosphere. Exterior lighting sensors and an astronomical clock control all exterior pole-mounted and wall-mounted light fixtures.

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The five-story-high atrium’s bridges and stairs connect multiple spaces. Atrium circulation lighting is always on, except for statutory holidays. A DALI control adjusts light output.

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In the atrium’s sitting areas, an astronomical clock and occupancy sensor control the lighting.

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The daylighting design utilizes large glazing walls, windows and sunlight. In the public courts entrance, daylight sensors control and dim the lighting levels.

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Daylight sensors and occupancy sensors control lighting in corridors with tall windows via a DALI lighting system.

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Daylight sensors and occupancy sensors control office area lighting with a DALI ballast connected to a DALI lighting-control system.

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Courtrooms utilize compact fluorescent down lights and cove lighting. Each fixture in the court rooms is fully dimmable with an addressable DALI ballast and controlled by a local digital control panel using the DALI interface.

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Secure areas employ high-security fixtures. Labs and autopsy areas, for example, utilize recessed fluorescent clean-room fixtures, which are controlled by local switches and a centralized DALI lighting system.

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Cuyahoga County Public Library-Garfield Heights Branch Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in a library’s energy-efficient lighting, designed to contribute to a goal of the building being designated as LEED Silver. Lighting control design by Ardra Zinkon, lighting designer, Tec Studio. Lighting controls by Lutron Electronics.

With LEED Silver as the goal, high-end expectations are met within this 30,000-sq.ft. new construction library branch through careful planning and integration of the lighting design solution. The lighting system for this project operates at a minimum of 16% less than 90.1 primarily through the use of fluorescent product to maintain the budget.

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The Café is illuminated with fluorescent pendants equipped with DALI dimming ballasts. Suspended CMH track fixtures highlight the display of current periodicals. The track is equipped with a current-limiting device for reduced energy consumption, and is tied to the DALI system through the use of an addressable switching module.

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As daylight filters in through the clerestory windows, continuous runs of linear fluorescent provide task illumination throughout the open architecture; at stack and computer stations and respond to RF photosensors. The linear pendants provide a hint of uplight emitted from the side cut-outs, ensuring contrast ratios are within recommended practice.

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Stack Areas require higher illumination than Seating or Computing, creating a challenge in an open environment. Ballast tuning was used within the multi-layered control strategy. An estimated savings of 25% has been calculated for these areas.

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Free-standing meeting rooms reside within the open structure. Fluorescent pendants provide even illumination, and are controlled via local occupancy sensor. Lighting can be easily re-configured (if needed) due to the use of a raised floor system for wiring and RF controls.

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Skylights within the teen area bring natural light into the space to ensure the location remains attractive to visitors, tucked into the back of the library. Daylight Harvesting has been used throughout the space for additional savings.

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In addition to reduced lighting power density and the innovative use of controls, this project has been approved for an innovation credit following the LEED credit for Sustainable Purchasing: Reduced Mercury in Lamps.

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