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ETC Helps Show Ancient Artwork in a New Light

When lighting designer Amarasri Songcharoen (aka Marci Song) of Seam Design was looking for the best lighting fixtures to light the 500-year-old Raphael Cartoons – a series of large art pieces by Rafael on exhibit in London’s Victoria & Albert Museum – she knew she needed something special. It had to be something that would output minimal or no ultraviolet light, as well as provide a perfectly lighted atmosphere for a giant mirrored sculpture that was to be installed as part of the London Design Festival.

As part of the month-long Precision & Poetry in Motion exhibition, design agency Barber Osgerby developed a system of two giant mirrored aeronautical “wings” that were suspended in the room and would slowly rotate on motors, altering the reflections of the Raphael Cartoons as they did. To light the artworks, she used 16 ETC Source Four LED™ Series 2 Lustr® fixtures, controlled by an ETC Ion® control desk.

“We were asked to provide a lighting strategy and design for the room and of the sculpture to reveal the Barber Osgerby sculpture in its best light,” says Song. “We also had to pay careful consideration to providing appropriate light sources and light levels for priceless art pieces, which are on loan from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.”

Photo by Ed Reeve.

Photo by Ed Reeve.

The sculpture’s wings were clad with a highly polished mirror finish. Song says that the best-lit effect was to light the elements surrounding it, rather than lighting the piece itself – but since the floating objects occupied most of the view to the ceiling – the existing high-level lights for the artwork would be blocked periodically, making them unsuitable for this installation.

Seam Design’s proposal therefore involved a completely new system for lighting the room, using striking illumination to the Raphael Cartoons and a dramatic wash to the floor. The Cartoons are then reflected on the wings above them, so that they can be seen by the people standing underneath.

“Through its slow rotations,” describes Song, “the sculpture is disorientating and mesmerizing, emerging from high level in an uncanny way. The dramatic light enhances these experiences.”

Photo by Ed Reeve.

Photo by Ed Reeve.

Each of the cartoons, which were commissioned by Pope Leo X in 1515 and were intended to hang below Michelangelo’s famous ceiling in the Vatican Palace, are up to 3.5m high by 5.3m wide (11.4ft x 17.4ft), which meant that even in the very large 46m long x 25m wide (151ft x 82ft) gallery, Seam had just 70cm (2.3ft) of clearance between the wings and the face of the artwork’s surfaces. They therefore needed a product capable of very wide beam-throw that still allowed for an ability to control light spill to the walls – plus, with ultraviolet light being a danger to artwork – they needed a low- or zero-UV fixture, making LED the obvious choice.

“ETC’s Source Four LED Series 2 Lustr with a 90-degree lens tethered to an ETC Ion desk met all of our requirements,” explains Song. “We were able to shutter and frame the light to enhance the artwork. The success of the lighting scheme is that the polished wings rely heavily on the illumination of the cartoons and the floor to be perceived. In the intimate darkness of the room, with focused light taking your attention to the artwork, the sculpture becomes very mysterious – almost imperceptible until they catch the light and reflections illuminate their surfaces. This is an incredible dimension to add to the experience of the installation, which is an epic feat of engineering in its own right and exhibits attributes entirely beyond its impressiveness as a machine.”

Photographer Credit : Ed Reeve

Seam worked closely with ETC and Hawthorns, who installed the lighting and helped to program the color tuning and settings. The fixtures were set to a very warm 2,600-degree color temperature – the color of candlelight – helping the Cartoons appear almost like tapestries as they may have looked in the 16th century.

Attending the launch event, ETC’s regional manager for the UK and Ireland, Mark White, was asked a number of times if the lighting on the cartoons was really LED and not tungsten. “LEDs are usually associated with the blue-white cold light fitted these days to bathrooms and the like,” he says, “so to see apparent candlelight coming from the Source Four LEDs was an eye-opener.”

“ETC and Hawthorns were very responsive, particularly on a fast-track install of two weeks with schedules changing day to day as we were getting near the opening,” concludes Song. “They were amazing teams to work with. And we heard that the museum likes it so much that there was talk to make the fixtures part of a permanent installation for the gallery.”

Photo by Ed Reeve.

Photo by Ed Reeve.

The Double Space for the BMW Precision & Poetry in Motion exhibition is on display at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum from September 13th through October 24th, 2014. Entry is free.

For more information about ETC products, visit www.etcconnect.com.

Wake Technical Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in facilitating the education experience in a lecture hall at Wake Technical Community College’s Northern Wake Campus. Lighting and control design by David B. Williams, Jon Cardenas and Anthony J. Garcia, lighting designers with Clark Nexsen, and Josh Allen of Theatre Consultants Collaborative, Inc. Lighting controls by ETC (Architectural DMX Controls, Wall Stations, Touch Screen, Wireless Network – ETC Unison Paradigm, Theatrical Dimming Rack – ETC Sensor AF 48 Module 96 Circuit, Dimming Rack with ETC ELTS2 Emergency Lighting Transfer System DMX Controls – ETC Element w/ 1 touchscreen monitor & 1 secondary standard monitor & remote). Photography by Brandon Sewell of Clark Nexsen.

Designers were tasked with providing a low maintenance, energy efficient “lecture hall” in a new academic building that included as many “auditorium” performance features as economically possible. This was achieved with fifty 86W, 5376 lumen, 40° spread, diffuse lensed, DMX dimmable, 3500K LED cylinders suspended between wood panels providing illumination for various learning and performance functions.

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House lighting controls are integrated with the performance dimming system, providing seamless controls during performances for smooth fades or quick pops. Each fixture is independently addressed allowing the stage manager to focus light exactly where desired.

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LED linear fixtures at the top and bottom of 8 windows and 5 faux windows set the mood, mimic daylight or augment performances, bringing the “stage” into the audience.

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In the center of the audience, the control booth is equipped with a performance grade DMX controller, allowing the stage manager complete control of house and performance lighting.

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When the stage manager is not present, untrained users can operate a simplified password protected touchscreen controller to recall and save presets, raise and lower shades or adjust lighting zones.

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Color coded LED controls are provided at each entrance and catwalk for pre-programmed scene calls and zone toggle; these lockout and change to blue when the room is set to “performance mode”. The system includes a Wi-Fi interface for control via mobile applications and wireless remote.

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Fixtures align with the raised ceiling above the stage.

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Fluorescents are switched backstage and above catwalks for maintenance.

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Blue LED aisle lights provided for performance operators.

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White LED aisle lights provided for performance egress. During an emergency, select circuits including non-dimming emergency-only LED cylinders are energized by generator via an automatic transfer switch.

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NCL Showroom Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in enhancing the visitor experience at a high-end lighting showroom. Lighting and control design by Alexander Shaw, Lighting Designer, Nouran Concept Lighting. Photography by Alia Al Shaz. Lighting controls by Beckhoff.

This showroom is dedicated to the exhibition of high-end lighting fixtures. The concept for the lighting design focused on a “lighting experience”, where visitors are drawn to a physical and perceptual encounter with lighting products and ideas.

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The interior was inspired on an industrial chic aesthetic. White textile walls modulate the space, creating corridors which resemble a traditional Arabic town. Surprise and discovery are the key elements. This provides the perfect background to showcase a variety of lighting elements.

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These textile walls were equipped with RGB sources to become dynamic color objects, capable of flooding the room with the most incredible saturated colors, changing the mood of the store in a matter of seconds.

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Cool white, amber and blue Led dots are activated by motion sensors when visitors enter the “outdoor” area. These, together with a blue hue from the walls, create an inviting moonlit atmosphere.

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The entire showroom is DALI controlled, enabling the creation of scenes based on customers’ behaviors and commands. e.g. motion sensors located at the entrance of corridors trigger a sequence of light dots on the floor, inviting to explore further.

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By default all chandeliers are off, creating a silhouette effect against the lit wall.

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Fixtures are touchpad controlled, allowing customers to switch on the desired product, dimming down the wall behind to increase contrast. Upon activation, the screen displays relevant fixture information (images, dimensions, specifications and related products).

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The application also allows to shift between scenes or manually control the wall colors.

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Keyboard screen for fixture selection.

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A smart automation criteria allowed great energy reduction. Fixtures are off by default but still the space looks intriguing and welcoming due to the lit walls. The wireless touchpads reduced conduiting and cabling costs and allowed flexibility for future store layouts.

Reflect at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center Lobby Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Excellence

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective application of lighting controls in nonresidential spaces.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in enhancing the visitor experience at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center Lobby, which features a special permanent light installation called “Reflect.” Lighting and control design by Brett Andersen, Dan Henry and Heath Hurwitz with Focus Lighting. Photography by Ivan Toth Depeña and Heath Hurwitz. Lighting and controls by Philips Color Kinetics using custom software developed by Focus Lighting.

“Reflect” is a permanent installation that utilizes sensors and light to explore the idea of circulation within the space – a government lobby adjacent to a transit hub.

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Light boxes, internally illuminated with RGB LED’s, were designed to precisely fit the lobby’s columns. The boxes enliven the space without intruding on the lobby’s existing architecture using a slim 6-inch profile that creates the illusion of interactive columns.

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Using movement as inspiration, the lighting designer developed custom camera-tracking software. Data generated from this software was then used to control the LED’s to display abstract reflections of passers-by.

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As visitors pass by the boxes, their pixelated, abstract reflection follows. When there is no movement within their vicinity, the light boxes replay animations from previously recorded interactions with visitors.

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Off-the-shelf video game cameras at the base of each box feed motion-tracking data to the custom software, which interprets the data and then commands each LED to a specific color. A full-size mock-up allowed the lighting designer to fine-tune programming details prior to being on site.

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The designer varied the sizes of the “pixels” within the box to create an interesting visual composition while adhering to incredibly tight budget constraints.

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LEDs minimize maintenance and maximize energy efficiency. In the rare instance maintenance is required, the boxes are constructed to swing open on a sturdy hinge.

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The lighting designer tested fixture brightness and multiple types of diffusion against the amount of daylight present to ensure the boxes were neither too bright nor too dim.

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Based on time of day, the control system cycles through a palette of predetermined color schemes that always look pleasing to the eye.

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“Reflect” engages visitors and promotes a sense of community through group interactivity and high-tech playfulness while enlivening the space itself through the constantly shifting looks of each lightbox.

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GE Delivers One Complete LED Lighting and Controls Solution for Net Zero Energy Office

When LPL Financial, the nation’s largest independent broker/dealer, an RIA custodian and an independent consultant to retirement plans, began envisioning a new zero net energy (ZNE) office building, it set four strategies to drive the project—energy efficiency, health and wellness of employees, connectivity and flexibility. Architects had a vision for a 13-floor, 415,000-square-foot office tower in San Diego, and designers had a desire for an efficient office lighting system that felt comfortable to occupants, allowed for added savings through dimming and daylight harvesting and could easily accommodate the changing needs of a growing business.

“GE rolled up their sleeves and got to work,” said Otto Orr, V.P. of project management, corporate real estate, LPL Financial. “They flew to Charlotte and immediately got engaged with our engineering team—looking at sketches, switching from fluorescent, eliminating fixtures. I’ve never seen a supplier jump in like this. Generally they’re looking for the architect to churn out drawings, and then they’re going to give you a proposal.

“From the start we felt like GE was one of us. They showed us that an LED solution was possible.”

At ease with LED
After investments in fuel cells for a consistent source of clean electricity, as well as an under-floor air-distribution system to reduce heating and cooling loads, LPL needed a similarly energy-conscious lighting strategy to help achieve its net-zero goal.

“We went in assuming we couldn’t afford LED office lighting within the project scope, and were hesitant to trust the technology in an interior space,” said Orr. “We’d seen a lot of advancements with LED in exterior and commercial areas, but we hadn’t come across counterparts doing it in a classic office setting. We pushed hard to explore available options with other manufacturers, before we realized GE was in the indoor fixtures market segment.

“After we sat down with them, we got very comfortable with the technology very quickly.”

By analyzing architectural drawings, GE’s experts conceived a new lighting scheme that converted fluorescent fixtures to LED, and further eliminated a number of them entirely, reducing total fixture count by nearly 40 percent. Lumination™ BL Series LED Luminaires were chosen for common aisles and employee areas—the long, narrow bands of light are integrated within the ceiling to lend a stunningly clean, contemporary look to LPL’s new office.

“The lights just go away in the ceiling,” said Orr. “It’s gorgeous. As you look down the plane you can’t even see the fixtures, and there are no shadow marks. It really works well with our layout.”

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Control of costs
Orr explained that when it came to office lighting controls, GE again simplified and streamlined what could have been a complicated process.

“We were actually looking at a fairly complex lighting control system that added a lot of cost to the project. That’s when GE demonstrated a much simpler solution that met our needs. More importantly, when you have a project this size, typically you have a lighting supplier, a controls manufacturer and a project manager involved.

“With GE it felt good to have all of that—a full lighting solution and a controls package to go with it—all in one bucket.”

With GE’s LightSweep™ lighting control system and Aware™ occupancy sensors, LPL now enjoys dimming and daylight harvesting capabilities on every floor, which are zoned to allow individuals to make their own adjustments.

“If an employee wants to dim down a workstation or a programmer wants a certain light level, we can do that without paying a fortune for features we don’t need,” said Orr, adding that throughout the entire project, LPL appreciated how GE was able to coordinate delivery and implementation for all lighting needs via its local San Diego partners Del Sol Resources and Crescent Electric Supply.

“Crescent’s partnership with Del Sol Resources and area contractors, plus its ability to provide dedicated project management and storage, staging and timely delivery of the LED fixtures by floor were also factors in making this a very successful project,” Orr said.

Designed to adapt
GE’s improved office lighting layout also gives LPL Financial a great degree of future flexibility.

“We designed the building with raised flooring and demountable walls in order to easily tear down and build up new configurations over time,” Orr said. “GE helped us create a regimented lighting pattern that puts all the fixtures right where they need to be to accommodate either an office or a workstation. It’s a universal plan that will allow us to ebb and flow seamlessly with our business unit reorganizations.”

Tracking returns
LPL will save an estimated $38,000 annually in lighting energy costs with LED opposed to fluorescent. Each floor of its new San Diego tower is metered to measure HVAC, plug, and lighting electrical loads separately. This data, displayed on an LCD monitor in the main lobby helps to make employees more informed about energy savings in the building.

The tower utilizes three fuel cells to convert biogas into carbon-neutral electricity that will allow the building to achieve net-zero energy status, and all surplus power is pushed back to the grid through San Diego Gas & Electric. Eighty-eight percent of the tower’s water consumption, nearly 2.5 million gallons annually, is recycled and used for irrigation and other building needs. On-site charging stations for electric vehicles are also available for employee use at no cost.

Finishing touches
The near 100-percent LED-lit building also uses GE’s Lumination™ BT Series LED recessed troffers in ceilings, as well as LED architectural lighting on walls and LED task lighting at workstations.

“You read stories about LED lights degrading—the color spectrum getting away from you, lights actually turning a different color,” said Orr. “After we heard about the research and all the hours of testing that GE puts in, we felt much better about product quality. But if there would be a failure, you want to make sure that a replacement is available, and we felt GE would be there to support us years down the road, which is something you can’t say for all brands.”

“The cost, the warranty, and the payback were all there, which made it easy to absorb GE’s LED lighting solution into the project scope.”

Future plans
LPL will closely study the San Diego building for the next few years and will immediately employ best practices like LED lighting in new construction projects, including an office in Charlotte, N.C.

“We believe we are the country’s largest net-zero commercial office building,” Orr said. “The passion was there, and now our group, including GE, drives it forward. This building shows our dedication to our employees and the environment—we created a net-zero strategy that, when we look back, we’ll be proud to say our activities and outreach started here.”

Fort Wellington Visitor Centre Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in enhancing the visitor experience at the visitor center of Fort Wellington, a National Historic Site. Lighting and control design by Nick Chu and Frank Park of DIALOG. Photography by Ben Rahn of A-Frame Studio. Lighting controls by LiteTouch.

A visitor center for a National Historic Site, this building was designed to be warm, inviting and required viewing access to the exterior historic grounds. Preservation and exhibition of artifacts was a key component and design challenge. A wooden hull of a vintage 1817 gunboat, was the main lighting feature. The combination of natural and artificial light were balanced via
controls, allowing the building to function as intended while highlighting and preserving irreplaceable historic elements. As the building is directly in the path of migratory birds, the lighting schedule and light pollution were critical design elements to consider. Lighting was an important design feature that highlighted the exceptional project design and the community’s history, while drawing in 30% more visitors.

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A central control panel located within the exhibit space controls window shades and dimmable LED (non-UV) light fixtures. To protect against deterioration, it’s important that artifacts have no direct exposure to UV. Photo sensors are strategically placed near exhibits and window shades are set to automatically close when direct daylight crosses a certain threshold. The LED fixtures can be automatically controlled to compensate when the shades are drawn.

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Due to the multiple display areas within the space, zoning was crucial for the controls. Designated display areas are separately zoned at the control panel, allowing for dimming and switching as displays change. Discrete lighting and control systems maintain focus on the exhibits.

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Dimmable LED fixtures allow for variable lighting levels depending on the amount of daylight while high CRI lamps ensure textures and wood grains are visible from above and below the exhibit. The control panel is completely configurable, enabling the curators to adjust and set appropriate levels.

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Energy Efficiency: Project was designed to meet LEED Gold levels.

Budget: Value engineering was completed at multiple stages. The project was ultimately finished on budget.

Forum Shops at Caesars Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in enhancing the visitor experience via producing a sky illumination effect at the Forum Shops at Caesars in Las Vegas. Lighting design by Jim Holladay of PRG. Photography by Nick Mays. Lighting controls by Pharos.

The client required the illusion of natural outdoor lighting, while keeping the number of luminaires (and cost) to a minimum. The LED fixtures’ top and bottom portions are lensed and controlled separately, allowing for evenness and fewer fixtures.

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The designers had to be careful not to cast shadows on the ceiling. The statues on the rooftops were lit from multiple angles to eliminate shadows.

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The entire mall covers 636,000 square feet. Even so, designers were limited to two universes of DMX. Each universe has a maximum capacity of transmitting 512 individual channels. Additional control cables had to be run, in conduit for shielding, and all additional electrical work had to remain hidden. In one area with no existing conduit, wireless DMX was incorporated.

DMX was mapped so the base fixtures would have the same start addresses in both universes. 60% of the fixtures have the same address and can be plugged into either universe without re-addressing.

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A wireless access point networked to the main controller is used to provide programming from the public areas. There are DMX to analog interfaces in nine areas, providing contractor control for the façade lighting.

Although exempt from the IECC codes, switching to LED fixtures presented a 30% energy savings.

Anaheim Convention Center Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Excellence

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in enhancing the visitor experience at the Anaheim Convention Center. Lighting design by Peter Maradudin and Kaitlin LeSage Crawford of StudioK1. Photography by Tom Paiva Photography. Lighting controls by ETC.

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A new pedestrian plaza for a convention center invites attendees with an entry monument that slowly changes color throughout the evening.

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The 1,000 foot long plaza is grounded by two large fountains at either end. Each fountain’s pumps, jets and RGB LED lighting are controlled by the centralized lighting control system of over 1,500 channels. The “Mountain Fountain” has a discreet program of color shifting independent from the other elements in the plaza.

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The unifying theme of the plaza is a “River of Light,” a pattern of 300 DMX controlled RGB luminaires programmed to mimic the kinetic flow of water from one fountain to the other.

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The “river” wends its way over 600 feet towards the convention center and the “Ocean Fountain” in the distance through a colonnade of palm trees. Every luminaire in the plaza is LED and is controlled by the centralized system with astronomical triggers. The system is adaptable for a limitless array of presets for different convention center events.

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A central arbor area can change color independently from the “River of Light.”

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The “Ocean Fountain” is controlled by the DMX lighting system, allowing for seamless integration of water and light movement.

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Limitless color combinations and patterns of movement are possible through the control software, which can integrate special effects and video files into complex event sequences, triggered by an astronomical time clock.

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Each jet of each fountain can shift color, allowing for multi-layered water feature events.

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Through energy-efficient luminaires and sophisticated controls, the entire lighting design can provide limitless entertainment using less than 0.1 watts per square foot.

The Barnes Foundation Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Excellence

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in illumination of art at the Barnes Foundation. Lighting design by Fisher Marantz Stone. Photography by Michael Moran/OTTO, Tom Crane and Fisher Marantz Stone. Lighting controls by ETC.

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Capped by a glass box roof, the aperture in the LightCourt directs reflected daylight into the north-facing galleries.

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Exterior windows in all galleries have 14% transmission glass as the first element of daylight control. Each window also has a 5% transmission motorized solar shade and an opaque shade to shield the art from direct sunlight; both are controlled by a centralized lighting system. The control system responds to photocell readings, allowing the use of daylight to be maximized, and electric light to supplement as required within conservation illumination levels.

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Controlled daylight and electric gallery lighting permits both outdoor views and full spectrum art lighting throughout, while keeping within conservation illumination thresholds.

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All second floor galleries have clerestories which provide screened daylight in tandem with indirect fluorescent lighting.

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A series of scaled mockups were created to audition various clerestory heights and ceiling apertures to maximize daylight, maintain light uniformity across the walls and reduce glare.

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The clerestory section is comprised of an exterior louver, high-performance glazing, motorized opaque shade, and an indirect 3500K digital ballast fluorescent cove. Individual wall-watching photocells control electric lighting in each Gallery.

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A full-scale mockup, of a typical gallery, used loggers to measure the daylight over the course of a year to help set thresholds within the final control system.

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On the gallery roof, a “suite” of 4 miniature windowed rooms, each equipped with a photocell, measures the real-time daylight and operates the solar shades in corresponding galleries.

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Lighting for the new galleries utilizes less than half of the lighting power density otherwise consumed by a standard track lighting solution. The control strategy further reduces the electric load by up to 40% in clear sky conditions.

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The exterior volume of the LightCourt roof houses a photovoltaic array which provides 8% of this LEED Platinum project’s electricity.

David C. Crago Collection Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in illumination of the David C. Crago Collection at the Pettit College of Law at Ohio Northern University. Architecture by Miller/Watson Architects. Lighting design by Metro CD Engineering. Photography by Ken Colwell, Ohio Northern University. Lighting and control products included cabinetry and cove lighting (Soft Strip LED by Edge Lighting), seven-day timer controls (EI500 Digital In-Wall Timers by Intermatic), Sensor Switch nLight-based occupancy sensors, and dimming controls (Diva ELV Dimmers by Lutron Electronics).

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Residing in the Taggart Law Library, the David C. Crago Rare Book and Special Collections Room houses early British and American legal treatises and other notable documents. In May 2012, the Library worked with Miller/Watson Architects to renovate the room, which had previously been closed off. The new 400-sq.ft., two-room space serves two primary functions—museum-quality display of rare books and documents in cherry and glass Amish cabinets, and a comfortable study space where faculty, students and visiting scholars can work.

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Project challenges included the need for strict climate control and selection of light sources that would support visual needs while satisfying best practices for storage and use of rare books. An environmental control system was specified to maintain constant temperature and humidity. For the lighting, Miller/Watson collaborated with Metro CD Engineering to select light sources that would protect the light-sensitive materials in the collection from the degrading effects of ultraviolet and infrared radiation.

“The elegant and classic design of the space required lighting that would not itself be a focal point, but rather highlight the displays while providing enough light to comfortably work in the space,” says Justin Schultz, PE, RCDD, LEED-AP ID+C, lead electrical engineer for Metro CD Engineering and an Ohio Northern University alumnus.

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Concealed LED strip lighting was integrated into the ceiling cove to distribute soft, indirect illumination in the space. Manual low-voltage electronic dimmers can be used to lower light levels from full output to eight percent. LED tabletop luminaires provide supplementary task lighting for study.

“LED lighting can typically be dimmed, but the lighting designer must pay extra attention to the details for ensuring compatibility between the lighting fixture and the controls,” notes Schultz. “Most commercial lighting cut sheets list the compatible dimmer models that have been tested with the lighting fixture. Oftentimes, the minimum dimmed level is determined by the model of dimmer used.”

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LED lighting is also integrated into the cabinetry, illuminating the rare books and artifacts on display. This type of application is well suited to the LED source, which is directional and minimizes ultraviolet and infrared emission.

“The LED strip lighting sources not only met the rare books’ preservation requirements, but also allowed such a low profile that the light sources are all hidden from view,” says Schultz. Long service life was another deciding factor in choosing LED.

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The use of seven-day digital timer switches ensures the lighting is turned OFF when the room is on display but not in use.

At full output, the lighting power density level came in at a low 0.74W/sq.ft.—far less than energy code requirements—with significant additional energy savings resulting from the ongoing use of dimmer controls. The project earned the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Edwin F. Guth Memorial Award for Interior Lighting Design as well as its Lighting Controls Innovation Award.

“I have a passion for lighting because it blends the artistic side of engineering with some of the latest advances in technology,” says Schultz. “Although we are not yet at the point that LED lighting should be universally specified, LED is the future of lighting design.”

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