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The Barnes Foundation Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Excellence

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in illumination of art at the Barnes Foundation. Lighting design by Fisher Marantz Stone. Photography by Michael Moran/OTTO, Tom Crane and Fisher Marantz Stone. Lighting controls by ETC.

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Capped by a glass box roof, the aperture in the LightCourt directs reflected daylight into the north-facing galleries.

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Exterior windows in all galleries have 14% transmission glass as the first element of daylight control. Each window also has a 5% transmission motorized solar shade and an opaque shade to shield the art from direct sunlight; both are controlled by a centralized lighting system. The control system responds to photocell readings, allowing the use of daylight to be maximized, and electric light to supplement as required within conservation illumination levels.

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Controlled daylight and electric gallery lighting permits both outdoor views and full spectrum art lighting throughout, while keeping within conservation illumination thresholds.

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All second floor galleries have clerestories which provide screened daylight in tandem with indirect fluorescent lighting.

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A series of scaled mockups were created to audition various clerestory heights and ceiling apertures to maximize daylight, maintain light uniformity across the walls and reduce glare.

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Click to enlarge in a new screen. Hit the backspace on your browser to return to the article.

The clerestory section is comprised of an exterior louver, high-performance glazing, motorized opaque shade, and an indirect 3500K digital ballast fluorescent cove. Individual wall-watching photocells control electric lighting in each Gallery.

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A full-scale mockup, of a typical gallery, used loggers to measure the daylight over the course of a year to help set thresholds within the final control system.

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On the gallery roof, a “suite” of 4 miniature windowed rooms, each equipped with a photocell, measures the real-time daylight and operates the solar shades in corresponding galleries.

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Lighting for the new galleries utilizes less than half of the lighting power density otherwise consumed by a standard track lighting solution. The control strategy further reduces the electric load by up to 40% in clear sky conditions.

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The exterior volume of the LightCourt roof houses a photovoltaic array which provides 8% of this LEED Platinum project’s electricity.

David C. Crago Collection Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play in illumination of the David C. Crago Collection at the Pettit College of Law at Ohio Northern University. Architecture by Miller/Watson Architects. Lighting design by Metro CD Engineering. Photography by Ken Colwell, Ohio Northern University. Lighting and control products included cabinetry and cove lighting (Soft Strip LED by Edge Lighting), seven-day timer controls (EI500 Digital In-Wall Timers by Intermatic), Sensor Switch nLight-based occupancy sensors, and dimming controls (Diva ELV Dimmers by Lutron Electronics).

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Residing in the Taggart Law Library, the David C. Crago Rare Book and Special Collections Room houses early British and American legal treatises and other notable documents. In May 2012, the Library worked with Miller/Watson Architects to renovate the room, which had previously been closed off. The new 400-sq.ft., two-room space serves two primary functions—museum-quality display of rare books and documents in cherry and glass Amish cabinets, and a comfortable study space where faculty, students and visiting scholars can work.

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Project challenges included the need for strict climate control and selection of light sources that would support visual needs while satisfying best practices for storage and use of rare books. An environmental control system was specified to maintain constant temperature and humidity. For the lighting, Miller/Watson collaborated with Metro CD Engineering to select light sources that would protect the light-sensitive materials in the collection from the degrading effects of ultraviolet and infrared radiation.

“The elegant and classic design of the space required lighting that would not itself be a focal point, but rather highlight the displays while providing enough light to comfortably work in the space,” says Justin Schultz, PE, RCDD, LEED-AP ID+C, lead electrical engineer for Metro CD Engineering and an Ohio Northern University alumnus.

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Concealed LED strip lighting was integrated into the ceiling cove to distribute soft, indirect illumination in the space. Manual low-voltage electronic dimmers can be used to lower light levels from full output to eight percent. LED tabletop luminaires provide supplementary task lighting for study.

“LED lighting can typically be dimmed, but the lighting designer must pay extra attention to the details for ensuring compatibility between the lighting fixture and the controls,” notes Schultz. “Most commercial lighting cut sheets list the compatible dimmer models that have been tested with the lighting fixture. Oftentimes, the minimum dimmed level is determined by the model of dimmer used.”

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LED lighting is also integrated into the cabinetry, illuminating the rare books and artifacts on display. This type of application is well suited to the LED source, which is directional and minimizes ultraviolet and infrared emission.

“The LED strip lighting sources not only met the rare books’ preservation requirements, but also allowed such a low profile that the light sources are all hidden from view,” says Schultz. Long service life was another deciding factor in choosing LED.

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The use of seven-day digital timer switches ensures the lighting is turned OFF when the room is on display but not in use.

At full output, the lighting power density level came in at a low 0.74W/sq.ft.—far less than energy code requirements—with significant additional energy savings resulting from the ongoing use of dimmer controls. The project earned the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Edwin F. Guth Memorial Award for Interior Lighting Design as well as its Lighting Controls Innovation Award.

“I have a passion for lighting because it blends the artistic side of engineering with some of the latest advances in technology,” says Schultz. “Although we are not yet at the point that LED lighting should be universally specified, LED is the future of lighting design.”

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Circuit of The Americas, Home of the Formula 1 U.S. Grand PrixTM and ESPN X Games, Selects Acuity Controls for its World-Class Campus

Circuit of The Americas (COTA) is a world-class performance, education and business center and home to the Formula 1 United States Grand Prix and 2014 ESPN Summer X Games. COTA now features Acuity Brands, Inc. outdoor lighting controls for site and maintenance management of its lighting systems. COTA selected the ROAMview™ wireless lighting monitoring and control system to help manage the outdoor lighting of its 1,335-acre site including the racetrack, associated facilities and parking lots.

The ROAMview system uses an automated central system with software that reports which lights are on and off, allowing COTA to more closely control lighting and maintenance and react immediately to lighting failures. ROAMview offers the flexibility to wirelessly adjust lighting at an individual fixture level on a daily basis for a variety of events. System benefits include reducing energy consumption and maintenance time and costs.

“The system is exceeding expectations; it successfully maintains parking lot, roadway and public walkway lighting with flexibility,” said Leo Garcia, COTA head electrician of energy management. “It has created a safe and manageable environment for a multitude of events and situations.”

COTA installed 139 ROAMview control nodes across the campus. The majority of the nodes were placed on metal halide fixtures within parking lots, along the main street at the venue (COTA Boulevard) as well as on new pedestrian walkways and roadways. ROAMview nodes were also installed in a newly constructed paddock area used for staging equipment.

COTA uses five lighting control scenarios with 10 individual zones to ensure the perfect lighting for every event such as concerts and Grand Prix races. The different scenarios and zones maintain traffic control and safety for pedestrians.

After installing and operating the ROAMview system, the control abilities at COTA have proved versatile and achieved positive feedback. “Venue staff has expressed a high level of satisfaction,” said Garcia. “The ability to easily adjust light settings across such a large area from one central location has made turning on and off lights really flexible for staff, so we hear a lot of positive feedback.”

Click here to learn more about the ROAMview system.

LLB Architects Lobby Wall Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play to create special lighting effects as part of the lobby wall at LLB Architects’ offices at 161 Exchange Street in Pawtucket, RI. Lighting control design by Katherine Abernathy LC, IALD and Jason Rainone IALD, LEED AP BD+C, lighting designers, Abernathy Lighting Design, Inc. Lighting and controls by Lumenpulse and LANBox.

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The lobby of this office building features a creative application of advanced lighting controls which highlights collaborative design. This wall is a changing statement of the environment; a visual representation of the primary characteristics of the weather at the present moment.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

The wall is composed of four translucent frosted acrylic panels, each 36”x96”. Each panel has a return extending from the panel to the back wall to provide color separation between adjacent panels. Below each panel is a DMX-512 controllable 3’-0” 10×60° LED color-changing luminaire which provides for relatively maintenance free programmable illumination while still meeting the project’s budget requirements.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

In coordination with the System’s Integrator, the lighting control system employs an internet connected desktop computer linked via Ethernet to a solid state DMX-512 lighting controller capable of multiple simultaneous cue stacks. Every hour, the computer accesses publicly available weather data for the local area from the National Weather Service and parses out the values for the four characteristics the wall represents; Wind Speed, Air Pressure, Relative Humidity, and Temperature. For each weather characteristic, an independent color gradient was established and programmed into the controller. For example, the Temperature gradient runs from blue for cooler temperatures to red for warmer temperatures.

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The results are then mapped to a value between 0% and 100% and applied as a position along each gradient to create a colorized representation of the weather for that hour. The resulting changes are staggered, one panel every 15 minutes with lighting fades occurring over several seconds to ensure that abrupt changes don’t draw the eye.

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The installation has a rated life of 120,000 hrs and draws only 207 watts. The result is a low maintenance, budget friendly installation which stands as a subtle, ever changing representation of the world outside the lobby door, created through technology and light.

Inamori Kyocera Museum of Fine Ceramics Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award Of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play at the Inamori Kyocera Museum of Fine Ceramics. Lighting control design by Ruslan Belous and Peter vom Scheidt, PE, LC, lighting designers for Wendel. Lighting controls by Lutron Electronics.

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This one-of-a-kind museum with custom designed illuminated display cases had numerous lighting control requirements.

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The corridor leading from the entrance to the main museum has a backlit wall display showing the history of fine ceramics. Lighting in the corridor is narrow profile linear fixtures with fluorescent lamps to also aid in the directionality of traffic.

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The vertical portion of the museum’s main backlit displays continues the timeline with graphics and text that describe the artifacts. The horizontal section contains the artifacts that are indirectly lit from within the steel enclosure with high efficiency fluorescent lamps. Specific items are highlighted with fixed focus recessed 1-watt LED point source fixtures with remote drivers.

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The movable displays are accented by track fixtures with MR-16 lamps. Every lighting function in the museum is independently controlled by a centralized control system. Presets for various scenes are also programmed for different uses of the space. The entrance glass element and permanent displays are all backlit with high output, 5000K white linear LED fixtures for long life, reduced energy consumption and ease of maintenance with remote drivers. Each of the sections of displays can be manually, automatically or remotely controlled.

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The main museum is open with high levels of natural lighting from north and south facing windows. Therefore, as to not overpower the backlit displays or create glare on the display glass, motorized shades were installed and tied to the control system. During most daytime hours of operation, natural light and light radiated from the displays is all that is needed. On dark days or during evening hours, natural light is supplemented with custom length, wall-mounted, direct/indirect linear fluorescent fixtures with T8 lamps. Completed within the budget, this unique museum will surely generate interest in this field of study.

Leviton’s LevNet RF Product Line Reduces Energy Usage by at Least 30% in VA Hospital

Managers of a Veterans Affairs Hospital in Dayton, Ohio recently searched for a solution to provide increased comfort and satisfaction for patients. The objective was to provide veterans lighting controls that were easy-to-reach. In addition, the VA Hospital had very strict requirements for the devices installed in the hospital.

The Challenge

* RF Interference: The VA Hospital is very particular about the devices installed in the hospital. The wireless controls were required to not interfere with the wireless devices already installed in the medical center
* Easy Plug-in Installation: Easy installation and zero-maintenance were major requirements [The installation needed to be fast and it was not acceptable to rely on battery replacements over time.].
* Flexible Solution & Patient Satisfaction: The hospital required the solution to be extremely flexible, allowing patients to be able to move the lighting switches according to preference.

The Solution

After searching through various solutions and methods, the hospital chose Leviton’s EnOcean-based energy harvesting wireless lighting controls. EnOcean solutions are extremely reliable, easy-to-use and flexible. The controls operate using uncongested radio frequencies–meeting all criteria imposed by the hospital.

The Results

Factoring electricity rates, occupancy history and installation costs; the hospital saw instant return on investment. Installation costs were lowered by at least 30% due to the fact that all controls were either a wireless or simple plug-in and forget solution. In addition, no one can attest to the joy, these switches gave to the patients of the hospital. Being able to move the switches to patient preference provided immense satisfaction to patients and employee’s alike, achieving the ultimate goal.

Lutron Controls Save Energy at The Gurdon Institute

“We wanted to reduce electricity consumption throughout The Gurdon Institute but we wanted to do this without affecting the ‘good science’ that is done here in developmental biology and cancer research.”
Kathy Hilton, building facilities manager at The Gurdon Institute

Background

The Gurdon Institute was identified by The University of Cambridge as one of five pilot departments for energy reduction, due to its high consumption levels. Alongside a behavior change campaign, energy saving technologies were researched that would maximize savings with minimum disruption to the researchers and their work environment. To see the impact that lighting control could have in “unloved” areas of The Gurdon Institute’s building facilities manager, Kathy Hilton, set up a trial in an equipment room; and a research laboratory.

The Challenge

As well as altering user behavior to their surroundings, The Gurdon Institute still had a large number of spaces within the building that were termed “unloved.” These were the areas that were not the responsibility of any one person or research group and so energy consumption in these areas was not “owned” by anyone. These areas involved a number of equipment rooms and general use laboratories.

The Solution

Energy monitoring and management company, Building Sustainability Ltd, installed Lutron’s Energi TriPak® retrofit wireless lighting control solution in a room that houses scientific equipment. This met Kathy Hilton’s classification of “unloved” perfectly, as it had no “owner” and individuals visited the room only sporadically throughout the day. As part of the upgrade, the existing T8 36W fluorescent where changed to more efficient T5 lamps and ballast. Having installed a wireless Lutron Rania® RF switch and two Radio Powr SavrTM wireless occupancy/vacancy sensors in the 50m2 equipment room, Building Sustainability Ltd. made the decision to fit a meter as well to allow them to monitor the results. Thanks to the wireless nature of Lutron’s Energi TriPak solution, the retrofit was carried out with no disruption to the researchers’ working day. The light control trial also incorporated a laboratory. As well as occupancy sensors it was decided that daylight harvesting sensors would also be included. Lutron’s EcoSystem Energy Savr NodeTM addressable lighting control was installed, along with four occupancy and daylight sensors and a tracking meter. The T8 36W fluorescents were also changed to lower energy T5 28W alternatives.

The Results

The electrical consumption was monitored and in the equipment room an average of 6.45kWh was used per 24 hours during the sensor controlled phase and an average of 16.39 kWh was consumed when it was switched to manual control. This equated to a 60% reduction between manual switching and sensor control. In the laboratory, usage went from 360 kWh to 160 kWh, a 56% reduction between manual switching, as well as sensor and daylight control. Following these successful trials, Lutron’s Energi TriPak retrofit solution has been installed in a further 97 zones, including research support and equipment rooms, stores, toilets and some small office areas.

Projected financial savings for these zones, based on the findings from the equipment room and lab trials, are:

• £10,000 projected financial savings per year
• 100,000 kWh electricity savings per year
• 54 tonnes of carbon saved per year
• Investment – £20,000 and payback – 2 years

Glumac Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications. In this award’s first three years, 34 projects were recognized with an Award of Merit and four with an Award of Excellence.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play at the Portland, OR-based office of Glumac Lighting Studio. Lighting and controls design by Glumac. Photography by Bruce Damonte. Lighting controls by Lutron Electronics and Crestron.

Every luminaire has local dimming control and complete adjustability from a networked control system. This tunablity has reduced the 0.63w/sq.ft. connected load to a constantly monitored average of 0.23w/sqft during peak hours.

Each configurable conference space uses separately controlled recessed fluorescents, LEDs and suspended direct and indirect components to ensure functional flexibility.

Each conference space can be controlled with a single dimmer at room entry, a 5-button scene controller near the presenter’s screen, or individual fixture and shade control via an iPad.

In the café space, the direct/indirect fluorescent fixtures mounted above the architectural metal ceiling help highlight the ceiling while obscuring the fixtures.

In private offices, direct/indirect fluorescent luminaires are used within the rhythm of the exposed concrete structure. When ample daylighting is present, fixtures are automatically dimmed down as low as 1%.

Vacancy sensors throughout every space are turned on manually when needed.

20w LED pendants are integrated within chilled sails over collaborative tables in each working neighborhood.

General office space is lit with adjustable task lights at each workstation. A 40w fluorescent lamp delivers 80% of the light up and 20% onto the task surface. Luminaires are shielded to produce no glare when seated or standing. Project maintenance is simple and inexpensive with only three lamp types and easily accessible fixtures.

With motorized shades raised, daylighting allows task lights to dim automatically. Wireless dimming controls allow each user to set a level or turn fixtures off.

Controls decrease watts/ft2 usage by 77% below ASHRAE maximum, 74% below Oregon energy code limits, 63% below full connected load without controls and 1% below basis of design.

Budget:

Upfront costs for the lighting system were higher than a more traditional office system but were offset by the annual energy cost savings and utility rebates for such an efficient system.

MGM Macau Grande Praca Wins IES Lighting Control Innovation Award of Merit

The Lighting Control Innovation Award was created in 2011 as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Illumination Awards program, which recognizes professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting design. LCA is proud to sponsor the Lighting Control Innovation Award, which recognizes projects that exemplify the effective use of lighting controls in nonresidential applications. In this award’s first three years, 34 projects were recognized with an Award of Merit and four with an Award of Excellence.

This month, we will explore the role that lighting controls play at the MGM Macau Grande Praca. Lighting and controls design by Matt Levesque, Catherine Hegdale, Michael Romero, Francis Mempin and Ellen Kuklinski of First Circle Design, LLC. Photography by David Flad. Lighting controls by PHAROS (LPC-1).

This 24-hour central plaza environment encompasses activity on all sides, requiring a lighting control system with capabilities to manage everything from standard daily operations to live performances and festival events. The skylight ceiling posed the additional challenge of balancing the vast indoor and outdoor environments throughout day and night.

The flexibility necessary for festivals further complicated the controls design. Employing skylight structure as cable raceway uniquely integrates and conceals control data for programmable LED luminaires and provides an unencumbered sky vista.

Severely restricted budget, no additional power, and a compressed timeline for installation combined for a distinctively multifaceted design.

A creative combination of control components, including dimming, photocells, timeclocks, remote web interface with manual override, and theatrical DMX inputs provide ownership with the flexibility desired. The web interface allows users to log in from anywhere in the world and review status or modify programming as needed through a customized password-protected infrastructure.

For standard operations, touchscreen controls allow personnel to log in and adjust all or part of the environment with a touch. Reference photos add clarity to touchscreen controls from remote locations.

DMX ports strategically located throughout the space provide capability for theatrical consoles to easily override the standard architectural operations, primarily triggered via timeclock. Photocells balance the vast skylight impact during the day, automatically compensating for overcast daytime conditions.

Schematic 3D modeling addressed the constraint of limited power, controlling the quantity and specification of LED luminaires and control system components. The completed energy reduction is significant enough to allow an additional theatrical system during live events without need for generators.

To manage the restricted budget of this overseas project, designers worked closely with manufacturers throughout the process, ensuring best cost and on-time delivery. Coordination throughout design, assembly, and shipping eliminated unexpected costs.

An inspired blend of ingenuity, specification, and coordination successfully provides an a An inspired blend of ingenuity, specification, and coordination successfully provides an accomplished design and entertaining, yet graceful environment.

Project: Lutron Controls at The Marriott Hotel, Frankfurt, Germany

The Marriott Hotel in Frankfurt wanted to refurbish its 588 rooms to ensure that they can meet the expectations of today’s guest by bringing in the latest in lighting and light control technology to deliver significant energy and cost savings, as well as an improved user experience.

“Today’s guest expects different standards from a hotel room than they did as recently as 10 years ago,” said Hansjörg Hefel, General Manager of the Frankfurt Marriott Hotel. “This refurbishment was undertaken not only to meet those requirements, but to future-proof our hotel for many years to come.”

The challenge:

Key to the refurbishment was the need for the hotel to continue day-to-day operation with minimal impact on guests. When it came to the lighting, the team at the Frankfurt Marriott Hotel wanted to incorporate increased lighting control throughout each of the bedrooms, including full room control from the bed area, as well as the entrance way. Conventional switch installation was tricky as each room’s wiring ran back to centralised cabinets and due to newly installed ceilings; some of these were covered, which made them difficult to access.

The solution:

Thanks to Lutron’s Energi TriPak, building services engineering company MJD was able to replace the existing light switches with the wireless retrofit solution in under 30 minutes in each room. Each room was retrofitted with three Lutron PowPak; one in the suspended ceiling in the bathroom, another in the AC box at the entrance to the room and a final one underneath the bed (to enable wiring to the floor lamp). Three Lutron Pico keypads were used to replace the existing light switches. The Pico controllers were programmed to talk to one or more of the PowPak wirelessly.

The results:

As a result of the wireless nature of Lutron’s latest retrofit light control solution, Energi TriPak, it was possible to fit out the entire 588 rooms with minimal noise and disturbance. This avoided any loss of customer bookings and meant the project was completed 15% faster than with standard switches. Also, as the fabric of the room was untouched, no redecoration costs were incurred.
As a result of the installation, the following savings were achieved:

• Avoided loss of revenue of approximately €600,000 (£518,325)
• Redecoration savings of €499,800 (£431,465)
• In total, savings of almost €1.1m (£950,486) in comparison to a regular installation with standard switches